Sharp develops energy-efficient displays for wearable gadgets

One of the major deficiencies in the current smart watches is their low durability. Thus, the model with the most interesting features and functions can work away from the outlet in only 1-2 days. To combat this problem came out Sharp, which, as many have guessed, will try to find a solution with energy-efficient displays.
Sharp develops energy-efficient displays for wearable gadgets
According to Japanese newspaper Nikkei, Sharp is working to create a liquid-crystal panels for wearable gadgets, which will be characterized by excessively low power consumption. Currently Sharp already has a prototype, the diagonal of which is 1 inch. According to the source, the prototype consumes 1,000 times less energy than traditional mobile displays.
Mass production of such panels scheduled for spring 2015. The secret of their low power lies in the fact that they are deprived of the backlight, and use a semiconductor memory device. The backlight will be implemented through the sources of natural light: inside the pixels applied reflective layers, which can illuminate what appears on the display. Accordingly, this is the main disadvantage of the design is to apply the display in low light conditions will not be so practical.

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